While we work to protect your banking privacy, you also play an important role in protecting your information. The material below will help to protect your identity and help keep you safe in a digital world.

Tips

  • Add your phone numbers to the national Do Not Call Registry at www.donotcall.gov or by calling 1-888-382-1222. Since February 2008, these registered telephone numbers will no longer expire off the list.
  • Examine your financial institution statements immediately upon receipt to determine whether there were any unauthorized transactions. Report any unauthorized transactions that you find immediately to Jackson County Bank.

Annually

  • Each year, you are entitled to one free credit report through www.annualcreditreport.com or by calling 1-877-322-8228.
  • Request a copy of your Social Security statements at www.ssa.gov/mystatement to be sure that no one else is using your social security number for employment.

Every 5 Years

Please read the other sections below to learn about the different types of fraud and how to prevent them, from spyware and other computer fraud to mail and phone fraud to email phishing and web spoofing. Our Fraud Summary page provides more tips on how to protect yourself.


Fraud Summary

Identity Theft is the most popular and profitable form of consumer fraud. It occurs when someone uses your personal information such as your name, Social Security number, credit card number or other identifying information, without your permission to commit fraud or other crimes.

Common ways identity theft can happen:

“Old Fashioned” Stealing

  • Thieves typically steal wallets and purses. They also steal mail such as credit card and bank statements, pre-approved credit card offers, check orders and other financial mail.

Dumpster Diving

  • Thieves dig through trash looking for bills, financial or other personal information.

Change of Address

  • Thieves modify or redirect your billing statements to another address by completing a “change of address” form.

Phishing

  • Thieves may send unsolicited Emails, pretending to be a financial institution or a company, asking you to click a link to update or confirm your personal or login information. The link is directed to a “spoof” website designed to look like a legitimate site.

Skimming

  • Thieves may use a card reader device to copy the card’s magnetic strip to duplicate without the card owner’s knowledge.

Monitor Your Accounts

Keep track of transactions on your accounts by logging in to Jackson County Bank‘s Digital Banking, where you can view your activity as it is posted.

Protect your personal information

  • Do not carry your Social Security card in your wallet.
  • Do not have personal information such as your Social Security number and driver’s license number printed on your checks.
  • Keep your new and cancelled checks in a safe place.
  • Do not leave your purse, wallet, checkbook, or any other forms of identification in your car
  • Shred or tear up any documents containing banking or credit information, especially pre-approved credit offers, before you throw them away. To opt out of pre-approved credit card offers, call 1-888-567-8688.
  • Keep your PINs and passwords a secret. Do not write them down or share them with anyone.

Computer Security

Jackson County Bank continually makes investments in state-of-the-art digital banking security to ensure we protect the confidentiality of every customer’s online information and to provide the utmost security of every user.

Computer protection tips:

  • Update your computer operating system on a regular basis.
  • Keep your browser current with the latest security updates.
  • Use updated anti-virus software.
  • Use updated anti-spyware software and consider using more than one, to ensure the most thorough scan.
  • Change your passwords on a regular basis, as a good practice to help prevent unauthorized access.
  • Download free software only from websites you know and trust.
  • Do not install software without knowing exactly what it is or what it will do (read the end-user license agreement).
  • Close pop-up ads by clicking on the “X” instead of clicking within the advertisement itself.
  • Review your browser security settings and set them to a high enough level to help detect unauthorized downloads. (Click your browser’s “Help” menu for steps).
  • Do not click link inside of spam email. Especially emails claiming to offer anti-spyware software.
  • Install a personal firewall on your computer. A firewall works like a filter that prevents access to information on your computer.
  • Don’t give any of your personal information to any web sites that do not use encryption or other secure methods to protect it.

Mail & Phone Security

We recommend you learn ways to protect yourself from common fraud schemes.

Vishing

Vishing scams target consumers by “spoofing” text or voicemail messages that ask you to call a phone number and give your personal information. Here’s how it works:

  • You receive a “spoof” email, text message, or voicemail about suspicious account activity.
  • The email, text message, or voicemail message will ask you to call a “customer service” number.
  • When you call the customer service number, a recording will ask you to provide personal information such as account numbers, passwords, a social security number, or other critical information.
  • The recording may not mention the company’s name and could potentially be an indication the call is being used for fraud.
  • In a variation of this scam, you may receive a phone call.
  • The call could be a “live” person or a recorded message.
  • The caller may already have your personal information, which may seem as if the call is legitimate.

Smishing

Smishing is when consumers’ cell phones and other mobile devices are targeted with mobile spam. The spam, or text messages, attempt to trick consumers into providing personal information. Here’s how it works:

  • You receive a fake text message, which may include a fraudulent link, asking you to register for an online service.
  • The scammer attempts to load a virus onto your cell phone or mobile device.
  • The scammer may also send a message ‘warning’ you that your account will be charged unless you cancel your supposed online order.
  • When you attempt to log on to the website, the scammer extracts your credit card number and other personal information.
  • In turn, your information is used to duplicate credit, debit and ATM cards.
  • Scammers may also send you a text message again ‘warning’ you that your bank account has been closed due to suspicious activity.
  • The text message will ask you to call a ‘customer service’ number to reactivate your account.
  • When you call the number, you are taken to an automated voice mail box that prompts you to key in your credit card, debit card or ATM card number, expiration date and PIN to verify your information.
  • Again, your information is used to duplicate credit, debit and ATM cards.

Lottery/Sweepstakes Scams

Lottery/Sweepstakes scams target consumers by a notification, which arrives through the mail, by email, or by an unsolicited telephone call. Here’s how it works:

  • The notification advises you have won a prize, but you did not enter in any type of lottery or sweepstake by the promoter contacting you.
  • The promoter will ask you to send payment to cover the cost of redeeming the prize when the prize does not exist.
  • In this type of scam, you may rarely if ever receive any winnings in return.

Check Overpayment Scams

Check Overpayment scams target consumers who sell items through an online auction site or a classified ad. Here’s how it works:

  • The seller takes a big loss when the ‘buyer’ passes a counterfeit cashier’s check, money order, corporate or personal check as payment.
  • The counterfeit check is written for more than the agreed price.
  • The ‘buyer’ will ask the consumer to wire back the difference after the check has been deposited.
  • The check will more than likely bounce and the consumer becomes liable for the entire amount.

Tips for the Mailbox

  • Deposit outgoing mail at the Post Office.
  • Remove incoming mail from your personal mailbox as soon as possible, or use a P.O. Box or locked, secure mailbox.
  • Request a mail hold from the United States Postal Service or call them at 1-800-275-8777 if you plan to be away from home for an extended period.
  • Know your billing cycles. If bills are late or missing, contact your creditors.
  • Watch for your new or replacement debit card from Jackson County Bank. You should receive it within five business days.
  • Switch to a more secure way of receiving your account statement. When you sign up for Jackson County Bank Digital Banking e-Statements, your statement will no longer sit in your mailbox. Instead, we will send you an email when your statement is available through your secure Digtial Banking account.

Tips for the phone

  • Do not give out personal information, such as your account numbers, card numbers, Social Security, tax identification numbers, passwords, or PINs, unless you have initiated the call.
  • We will not make an unsolicited call requesting your personal information.
  • If you ever believe you are not talking to a representative of a legitimate company, hang up and call the phone number listed in the telephone book.

Phishing & Spoofing

Phishing scams target consumers by “spoofing” emails and websites. Here’s how it works:

  • You receive an email message , asking you to click on a link in order to update some sensitive personal information.
  • The link will redirect you to a “spoofed” website, which is designed to look like a legitimate website.
  • The website will ask you to input personal information such as your account numbers, PINs , or a social security number.

Email Protection Tips

  • Do not click links in Emails to log in, or to update or confirm your sensitive information
  • Do not fill out forms in Emails
  • Be cautious about opening attachments or downloading files, regardless of who sent them
  • ‘Spam’, or mass email messages, often contain links to phishing websites and other unsavory websites.
  • Many phishing scams originate outside of the United States. Be wary of emails from people or sources you don’t know or trust.
  • Poor grammar and misspelled words from unknown sources asking you for personal information are clear warning signs of a phishing scam being operated outside of the United States.
  • Legitimate companies or organizations will never ask you to divulge any personal information over email.
  • Phishing emails may also be fake contests or offerings, asking you to input personal information.
  • If an offer or email you receive is too good to be true, it most likely is.

Bank Error Messages

A popular scheme by fraudsters involves spoofing bank error messages. Here’s how it works:

  • Fraudsters will send you an email message about a data or site maintenance error at Jackson County Bank or any of your banks.
  • The email will ask you to click on a link, which will redirect you to a site and will install malware on your computer.
  • This malware allows scammers to intercept your password and bypass the dual authentication system many financial institutions use.
  • The next time you attempt to log in to your online banking service, scammers attempt to steal your password and may quickly drain your account.

Emails from Jackson County Bank

For your protection, we will not send you an email to update or confirm your sensitive information by clicking a link or replying.

Emails to Jackson County Bank

Please do not send personal information in un-secure email. Secure email may be sent from the Secure Feedback form from within our Online Banking’s Support Tab.

“Cyber Security” refers to the technologies and processes designed to protect computers, networks and data from unauthorized access, vulnerabilities, and attacks delivered via the internet.

The following are links to help you understand online security and to keep your information safe.

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) has a webpage dedicated to consumer assistance topics.   Click HERE  

On Guard Online is the Federal Trade Commission’s website to help you stay safe and secure online:  Click HERE

What is Corporate Account Takeover?

Criminal entities employ various methods to obtain access to the legitimate banking credentials from businesses, including mimicking an institution’s website, using malware and viruses to compromise the business’ system, or using social engineering to defraud employees into revealing security credentials or other sensitive data.

For example, a business’ systems may be compromised by:

  • An infected document attached to an email
  • A link within an email that connects to an infected website
  • Employees visiting legitimate websites – especially social networking sites – and clicking on the infected documents, videos, or photos posted there.
  • An employee using a flash drive that was infected by another computer

In each case, fraudsters exploit the infected system to obtain security credentials that they can use to access a company’s business accounts. The criminal can then initiate funds transfers by ACH or wire transfer to the bank accounts of associates. Access to the computers of the business may also allow sensitive customer information to be stolen or destroyed.

How do I limit the risk of Corporate Takeover in my Business?

Your employees are the first line of defense against Corporate Account Takeover. Employee education and a strong security program can help prevent data and financial losses. Here are controls that may help mitigate your risk.

  • Perform online banking activities from a stand-alone computer system from which email and Web browsing are not allowed.
  • Be suspicious of emails purporting to be from a financial institution, government department or other agency requesting account information, account verification or banking access credentials such as usernames, passwords, PIN codes and similar information. Opening file attachments or clicking on web links in suspicious emails could expose the system to malicious code that could hijack your computer.
  • Install a dedicated, actively managed firewall, especially if your business has a broadband or dedicated connection to the Internet, such as DSL or cable. A firewall limits the potential for unauthorized access to a network and computers.
  • Create strong passwords with at least 10 characters that include a combination of mixed case letters, numbers and special characters.
  • Prohibit the use of “shared” usernames and passwords for online banking systems and never share password information with third-party providers. The bank will never ask you for your online banking credentials in an unsolicited telephone call or email.
  • Use a different password for each Web site that is accessed.
  • Limit administrative rights on users’ workstations to help prevent the inadvertent downloading of malware or other viruses.
  • Limit user access rights to only the functions they will need to complete their work tasks.
  • Educate employees on good cyber security practices to include how to avoid having malware installed on the business computer.
  • Install commercial anti-virus and desktop firewall software on all computer systems. Free software may not provide protection against the latest threats compared with an industry standard product.
  • Ensure virus protection and security software are updated regularly.
  • Ensure computers are patched regularly particularly operating system and key application with security patches. It may be possible to sign up for automatic updates for the operating system and many applications.
  • Reconcile your banking transactions on a daily basis. Be sure to report any suspicious activity or unauthorized transactions on your account to the bank as soon as possible at (606) 287-8484.
  • Consider using dual control when processing high risk transactions such as ACH and wire transfer payments. One authorized user would enter transactions while another authorized user would approve and transmit the transactions.
  • Verify use of a secure session (https:// not http://) in the browser for all online financial transactions, including online banking.
  • Avoid using automatic login features that save usernames and passwords for online banking.
  • Never leave a computer unattended while using any online banking or investing service.
  • Never access bank or other financial services information at Internet cafes, public libraries, etc. Unauthorized software may have been installed to trap account number and sign on information leaving the customer vulnerable to possible fraud.
  • Properly log out of each online banking session and close all browser windows. Simply closing the active window may not be enough.
  • When finished with the computer, turn it off or disconnect it from the Internet.
  • Consider utilizing a security expert to test the network or run security software that will aid you in identifying known vulnerabilities.

Learn what ransomware is, how to avoid it and how to know if you are a victim.

Find out more at:  http://stopransomware.gov

Todays Date is October 19, 2021


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